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1. Copyright University of Auckland


Copyright is a complex issue. The University of Auckland provides a number of documents related to copyright issues. University of Auckland staff can access these documents on the staff intranet athttp://web.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/for/staff/teaching/copyright-for-staff/
You can also access information about copyright through the University library.
http://www.library.auckland.ac.nz/subjects/bio/pdfs/Copyright2005.pdf

2. Copyright Council of New Zealand


If you want to look at copyright law in the New Zealand Context then visit the New Zealand Copyright Council Web page. You can also download an information sheet that will tell you about the basics of copyright law in New Zealand. The purpose of this information sheet is to give general introductory information about copyright.


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http://www.copyright.org.nz/viewInfosheet.php?sheet=29

There are additional information sheets covering education, educational PowerPoiint Presentations and other useful topics such as obtaining permission to use copyright objects.

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http://www.copyright.org.nz/infosheets.php

3. World Intellectual Property Organization


Whilst I am not in any way vouching for the veracity of this information, I found the information from the World Intellectual Property Organization to be helpful in understanding copyright issues. You can access their web page on intellectual property rights - including copyright - by going to
http://www.wipo.int/freepublications/en/intproperty/909/wipo_pub_909.html#int_prop

Some of the useful points that I took from the web page are as follows:

  1. Intellectual property can refer to industrial property - e.g. patents for inventions or to copyright - artistic creations such as books or music or paintings or sculptures.
  2. There are two aspects to copyright. The first is economic and the second is moral.
  3. Economic rights allow the rights owner to derive financial reward from the use of his works by others.
  4. Moral rights allow the author to take certain actions to preserve the personal link between himself and the work.
  5. Copyright generally rests with the author but can rest with the author’s employer if there is an agreement to this effect.
  6. Copyright protects the form of the expression of the ideas rather than the ideas themselves which means that copyright protects the author(s) from those who take and use the form in which the original work was expressed by the author.
  7. In some countries (don’t know about NZ) economic rights can be transferred or assigned so that another party owns copyright. Royalties are then paid to original copyright holder.
  8. In some countries (don’t know about NZ) economic rights can be licensed so that copyright remains with original author whilst a license is granted to a third party. Royalties are then paid to original copyright holder.
  9. Authors retain moral rights even when they have assigned or licensed economic rights.