Bookmark and Share

1. Tagging in Teaching


user_48.png1.1 Lecturers

  • Save and access personal bookmarks via a web browser so that the bookmarks will then be accessible from any internet connected computer.
  • Classify/categorize/index bookmarks with multiple meaningful user-defined tags and user notes describing the bookmarked site(s).
  • Share bookmarks publicly to contribute to the delicious community in a meaningful way through adding succinct notes on the value of the tagged resources.
  • Discover new web pages related to a particular subject area through following the bookmarks of members of the delicious community.
  • See how popular a resource is - and possibly judge its worth - by seeing how many other people have bookmarked it.
  • Subscribe to other users pages to receive updates automatically when they update the bookmarks on their pages.
  • Identify other researchers and individuals with similar interests through following links to others who have saved similar pages.
  • Create a private network to share bookmarks on a particular subject area with students thereby creating a dynamic library of resources for students.
  • Be creative! Ask students to critically reflect on your own resources and to add commented tags of their own to supplement your resources.
  • Ask students to create an annotated "bibliography" of tagged websites for a particular subject area and to justify their choice of sites in terms of a set of criteria. For example, relevance to subject matter, academic standard, usefulness of information and adherence to copyright.

user_48.png1.2 Students

  • Save and access personal bookmarks via a web browser so that the bookmarks will then be accessible from any internet connected computer.
  • Classify/categorize/index bookmarks with multiple meaningful user-defined tags and user notes describing the bookmarked site(s) thereby creating an online index of resources for their various courses.
  • Share bookmarks to contribute to the delicious community in a meaningful way through adding succinct notes on the value of the tagged resources.
  • Discover new web pages related to a particular subject area through following the bookmarks of members of the delicious community.
  • See how popular a resource is - and possibly judge its worth - by seeing how many other people have bookmarked it.
  • Subscribe to other users pages to receive updates automatically when they update the bookmarks on their pages.
  • Create a private network to tag and share bookmarks with fellow students studying the same course.
  • Identify other students, individuals and general users with similar interests through following links to others who have saved similar pages.
  • Create a private network to share bookmarks with members of a particular study group for the purposes of discussion and collaborative learning.
  • Make connections with students from all over the world through following tagged sites.

2. Example


Social bookmarking services provide you with a way to save the location of your favorite web sites and to add tags or descriptive words to the saved record so that you can more easily find sites that you have saved. The practice is social because your bookmarks are available to others and because other peoples' bookmarks are available to you. There is potential for social bookmarking to be used in education. Teachers might make their course related bookmarks available to students by e.g. embedding the course bookmarks on a page (see below). However, students seem to be most likely to engage with resources and activities when they see a clear purpose and when assessment is involved. Therefore, more may be needed. One possibility would be to ask students to assess the academic rigor of information provided on the sites bookmarked for the course. This would potentially help students to develop their critical thinking skills.
Intended Learning Outcome
Learning Activity
Assessment
Students will be able to come to a conclusion concerning the research value of information provided on the world wide web.
Students will choose three bookmarked sites. Drawing on knowledge gained from research skills sessions, students will critically analyze the quality of information provided on the web page. Students will be asked to make a judgement about the value of the information.
Students will be assessed on the quality of their critical analysis. Quality will be judged using the associated marking rubric.

This is the Rich Site Summary (RSS) feed for the LTU demonstration delicious account. This is a way to guide your students towards recommended web resources. If you're bookmarking sites for your own research then it is very simple to add this RSS feed to a page for your students. Alternatively you can send the RSS feed address to your students and they can subscribe to your bookmarks. Just remember that your students will see everything that you bookmark in your delicious account.


    This is the RSS feed for a user on delicious. Your students might subscribe to any feed using one of a range of freely available news readers. That way students would be continually receiving lists of recently saved book marks from sources suggested by you or your students.



      paper_content_pencil_48.png3. Research Articles

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      image_warning_48.pngAbbitt, J., & Odell, M. (2007). Using Social Bookmarking to Enhance an Undergraduate Educational Technology Course. Paper presented at the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2007, San Antonio, Texas, USA. Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org/p/24930.

      This is a very brief paper outlining a project to evaluate the use of a social bookmarking service in education. The purpose of this project was to develop a way for undergraduate students enrolled in a course on Educational Technology to collectively contribute and share resources and information relating to the influence of technology on education that are available on the Internet. Researchers were interested in understanding students' usage behavior in order to further improve the system for educational purposes so they developed their own social bookmarking system that was able to track user behavior such as visits to a site posted by other users of the system. The paper is only really useful in terms of providing a range of research questions that might be asked in another context.

      image_warning_48.pngHsu, Y.-C., Ching, Y.-H., & Grabowski, B. (2008). Bookmarking/Tagging in the Web 2.0 Era: From an Individual Cognitive Tool to a Collaborative Knowledge Construction Tool for Educators. Paper presented at the World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2008, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.
      Retrieved from http://www.editlib.org/p/29722.

      This is a 6 page article with the first 3 pages dedicated to explaining social bookmarking. In the second half of the paper the authors share their experience in introducing a social bookmarking tool to educators in a web-based technology integration course. The abstract suggests that the authors will share what the learned about the practicality and usability of social tagging for educators. However, in reality the authors provide a brief report on the use of the social bookmarking tool by educators. The authors refer to gathering feedback from students but the analysis of the students' bookmarking activities seems to be limited to based on the personal reflections of the "researchers".


      image_add_48.pngGray, K., Kennedy, G., Waycott, J., Dalgarno, B., Bennett, S., Chang, R., et al. (2009). Educating the Net Generation: A Toolkit of Resources for Educators in Australian Universities.
      Retrieved from http://www.netgen.unimelb.edu.au/outcomes/toolkit.html

      This publication includes a page of references for the use of Social Bookmarking in education. It's a good place to start if you want to source some articles to help you to decide what you want to do with social bookmarking in your own teaching.


      image_add_48.pngKennedy, G., Dalgarno, B., Bennett, S., Gray, K., Waycott, J., Judd, T., et al. (2009). Educating the Net Generation: A Handbook of Resources for Practice and Policy.
      Retrieved from http://www.netgen.unimelb.edu.au/outcomes/handBook.html

      This publication provides a case study of the use of social bookmarking by first year arts students to create and share information resources online in preparation for essay writing. Despite the fact that the learning activity appears to have been well-designed, student participation rates were very low (less than 3% of the cohort). The social bookmarking activity was one of five activities that students could choose and it was not assessed. This may account for the low participation rate.