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Tuesday, May 24

  1. page space.menu edited {comment_48.png} Evaluations Pre Course Questionnaire Post Course Evaluation {folder_add_48…
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    Evaluations
    Pre Course Questionnaire
    Post Course Evaluation
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Monday, May 23

  1. page What is Web 2.0 edited ... Web 2.0 applications services are ubiquitous. The Web 2.0 Directory provides a visual represen…
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    Web 2.0 applications services are ubiquitous. The Web 2.0 Directory provides a visual representation of hundreds of many of these Web 2.0 tools . The site categorizes the tools according to type e.g. photo tools, video tools, e-learning tools which makes finding the right tool a little easier. You might want to watch the video below that explains the features and functions of the Web 2.0 Directory website.
    {paper_content_pencil_48.png} 3. Research Articles
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    Free
    Free Access
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    Pay
    Pay for Access
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    UOA
    UOA Subscription Access
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    It's a book
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    {image_add_48.png} Anderson, P. (2007). What is Web 2.0? Ideas, Technologies and Implications for Education. 1-64.
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Monday, May 16

  1. page Wikis in Teaching edited ... Retrieved from http://ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth04/procs/pdf/augar.pdf This paper pres…
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    Retrieved from http://ascilite.org.au/conferences/perth04/procs/pdf/augar.pdf
    This paper presents wikis as a useful tool for facilitating online education. Basic wiki functionality is outlined and different wikis are reviewed to highlight the features that make them a valuable technology for teaching and learning online. If you're new to wikis and want an understanding of their functionality then this paper will be helpful. Note however that the paper was written in 2004 and there are now many more commercial wiki products available. These commercial wikis include a range of functions not found in earlier wikis e.g. easy embedding of a range of media files. The paper discuses also discusses a wiki project underway at Deakin University. This project used a wiki to host an icebreaker exercise which aimed to facilitate ongoing interaction between members of online learning groups. Virtually all students participated and participating students completed the exercise to a satisfactory standard. Researchers identified the potential - since realized to some degree - for the use of Wikis in online collaborative learning.
    {image_add_48.png} Baltzersen, R. K. (2010). Radical Transparency: Open Access as a Key Concept in Wiki Pedagogy. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 26(6), 791-809.
    Retrieved from http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet26/baltzersen.pdf
    Educators have just started to use wikis and most of the educational research to date has focused primarily on the use of local wikis with access limitations. There seems to be little research related to how students can contribute in global, transparent wiki communities such as Wikipedia and Wikibooks. The purpose of this article is to argue that we need to extend our understanding of transparency as a pedagogical concept if we want to use these open, global wiki communities in an educational setting. By describing one wiki based course in detail, I argue that these kinds of radically transparent learning environments in tertiary education challenge traditional pedagogy and our ordinary perceptions of what a class and working assignment is. The course data in this article include a course description and teacher and student reflections on assessed group projects which produced “student written, collaboratively edited textbooks” on Wikibooks. Student perceptions indicate positive attitudes towards global learning environments, if the didactical design is carefully planned. In the article I suggest that “outsiders” and “former and future students” should be included as categories in a pedagogical definition of transparency. These categories represent a radical expansion of course space and course availability.

    {image_warning_48.png} Bastida, R., McGrath, I., & Maude, P. (2010). Wiki Use in Mental Health Practice: Recognizing Potential Use of Collaborative Technology. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 19(2), 142-148.
    Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00655.x
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    Retrieved from http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet24/elgort.pdf
    This study reports on students' and lecturers' perceptions of using wikis as a platform for conducting assessed group projects in two postgraduate Master's level university courses. The two Master's level courses - an information management course and a library studies course - were chosen because both had a substantial group work assignment which could translate well to a wiki environment. The implementation of the wiki tasks is grounded in learning theory with particular reference made to student centered learning and collaborative learning . The results from this study showed that: group tasks need to be designed to facilitate critical judgment and assessment criteria need to foreground analysis and evaluation of information in order to engage students in higher order thinking; that student attitudes to group work, in general, are mixed, and that the use of wikis per se is not enough to improve these attitudes; that expectations for academic rigor must be clearly explained to students because a Wiki can be seen as a less formal environment. On the positive side, students found wikis useful for arranging information and sharing knowledge, while instructors thought wikis made managing and marking group work easier and more effective.
    {image_add_48.png} Baltzersen, R. K. (2010). Radical Transparency: Open Access as a Key Concept in Wiki Pedagogy. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 26(6), 791-809.
    Retrieved from http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet26/baltzersen.pdf
    Educators have just started to use wikis and most of the educational research to date has focused primarily on the use of local wikis with access limitations. There seems to be little research related to how students can contribute in global, transparent wiki communities such as Wikipedia and Wikibooks. The purpose of this article is to argue that we need to extend our understanding of transparency as a pedagogical concept if we want to use these open, global wiki communities in an educational setting. By describing one wiki based course in detail, I argue that these kinds of radically transparent learning environments in tertiary education challenge traditional pedagogy and our ordinary perceptions of what a class and working assignment is. The course data in this article include a course description and teacher and student reflections on assessed group projects which produced “student written, collaboratively edited textbooks” on Wikibooks. Student perceptions indicate positive attitudes towards global learning environments, if the didactical design is carefully planned. In the article I suggest that “outsiders” and “former and future students” should be included as categories in a pedagogical definition of transparency. These categories represent a radical expansion of course space and course availability.
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    Gray, K.,
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    Australian Universities. Retrieved from
    Retrieved from http://www.netgen.unimelb.edu.au/outcomes/toolkit.html
    This publication includes a page of references for the use of Wikis in education. It's a good place to start if you want to source some articles to help you to decide what you want to do with a wikis in your own teaching.
    {image_add_48.png} Guo, Z., & Stevens, K. J. (2011). Factors Influencing Perceived Usefulness of Wikis for Group Collaborative Learning By First Year Students. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 27(2), 221-242.
    Retrieved from http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet27/guo.html
    This study reports the findings of an investigation of the factors influencing the use and usefulness of wikis in an introductory, undergraduate information systems course. Informed by the media choice, technology acceptance model from information systems research, and group collaborative learning research from the education literature, a survey instrument was developed and administered across the entire course. The study found that wiki use was influenced by the student's prior expertise with wikis, with their perceived usefulness of wikis being strongly influenced by their teachers' attitudes towards the technology, and the ease of access to the wikis. The students' overall attitude towards wikis was largely influenced by the extent to which they saw wikis as helping with their assignment work, and their intention to use wikis in the future was driven by their perception of wiki's usefulness. The paper concludes with an outline of the lessons learned from the study and recommendations for instructors who are thinking of using wikis in their teaching.

    {image_add_48.png} Joint Information Systems Committee. (2009). Effective Practice in a Digital Age: A Guide to Technology-Enhanced Learning and Teaching.
    Retrieved from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/documents/effectivepracticedigitalage.aspx
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    This pilot study examined the perceptions of pre-service teachers regarding the usefulness of wikis to develop a collection of curriculum-based web sites for use with their future students. Further, it examined the consistency of their participation in the reader, writer and editor roles. The results revealed that participants did not consistently read, write or edit the wiki during the semester. Reasons given for the lack of consistent participation in the reader and writer roles were lack of motivation, lack of time and lack of understanding. Participants were very uncomfortable with editing the work of others and with others editing their work. They liked the accessibility that wikis provide and that they could collaborate with peers without sending multiple emails and at a time of their choosing.
    {image_warning_48.png} Su, F., & Beaumont, C. (2010). Evaluating the use of a wiki for collaborative learning. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 47(4), 417-431.
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    from http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/14703297.2010.518428
    A wiki is able to provide a learning environment which is closely aligned with the social-constructivist approach and is more natural than many tools where open collaboration and the exchange of ideas are important. This case study analyses and evaluates essential aspects for the successful deployment of a wiki in a higher education setting using Salmon’s five-stage e-learning framework. Indicators of the learning benefits were determined by qualitative analysis of students’ wiki contributions. Students’ perceptions were captured through interviews and questionnaires at the start and end of the project, thereby providing indicators of their motivation towards this method of learning. Our results suggest that a wiki can promote effective collaborative learning and confidence in formative self and peer assessment by facilitating rapid feedback, vicarious learning through observing others’ contributions and easy navigation and tracking facilities. Student authorship was also encouraged. Issues identified included providing easy access to the wiki, lack of personalisation, possible vandalism and plagiarism. Also, students with learning difficulties might require extra help and take longer to familiarise themselves with this new e-learning environment.
    {image_add_48.png} Weaver, D., Viper, S., Latter, J., & McIntosh, P. C. (2010). Off Campus Students' Experiences Collaborating Online Using Wikis. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 26(6), 847-860.
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